Cheeseburger with Fried Egg

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What’s better than a nice juicy burger? A nice juicy burger with cheese and egg! …and mayo and ketchup…just sayin’.

Came home from work yesterday and threw these together using this recipe from Todd Wilbur’s Top Secret Recipes. It’s supposed to replicate the spice blend found in Fuddrucker’s hamburgers. It’s been a while so I don’t remember what Fudd’s hamburgers taste like, but I remember liking them. This seasoning was nice, but I think it needs some playing around with. Two people at the table are not a fan of spicy foods and this was absolutely no problem for them.

Ingredients and Instructions:

Mix together:

  • 2 tsp paprika
  • 1 1/2 tsp ground black pepper
  • 1 1/4 tsp  salt
  • 1/2 tsp dark brown sugar
  • 1/4 tsp garlic powder
  • 1/4 tsp onion powder (I ran out of onion powder so I reconstituted -and then drained- some freeze-dried diced onion)
  • 1/4 tsp ground cayenne pepper

Sprinkle on burgers before cooking. (I just poured some into the beef/pork mix I made and then cooked them)

Note: apparently adding salt before forming the patties dissolves the muscle proteins and results in a less tender burger. See other notes from the Burger Lab here.

I mixed (or rather my Mom mixed) one lb of pork with one lb of beef and then added the spice mix. We cooked them for about 3 mins each side and then added cheddar cheese, covered the pans and let them cook for another 2 mins. I like my burgers medium rare so these were a little too done for me; tasted good though. I used the pan I cooked the burgers in to make the fried eggs. I was in a bit of a hurry so I just fried them up quick. For a good way to make a great sunny side up egg, check out the Pioneer Woman (love ya, Ree!). Served these on sesame buns…I vote for toasting them, but no one else wanted toasted – heathens!

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Pot Stickers…my easy, yet time consuming, comfort food!

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Let it be known, I LOVE Chinese food. I could easily devour a bag of pot stickers in one sitting (it’s my secret shame). My Mom’s high school friend and daughter are staying with us and lo-and-behold, what is one of the daughter’s favorite foods? BAM! POT STICKERS!… and there was my excuse to make some.

Now the store didn’t have proper dumpling wrappers so I used wonton wrappers. They were a bit small but worked out fine. I also used a small empanda press (which I would highly recommend doing) to shape the pot stickers. I enlisted the friend’s daughter’s help and yes, you are in fact the coolest 17-year old I know. When we were done we had an army of tiny yummy pot stickers. I served this with beef and broccoli.

Now, in order to cook this small army of pot stickers, I pulled out the big show-n0-mercy pan…a fateful choice as it was not nonstick. A moment of silence for the first batch of pot stickers if you please. … (we still ate them because comeon, POT STICKERS!)

It took three or four more batches (now in non stick pans) to cook all of the pot stickers but we got there. I felt like a short order cook because I had two skillets going at the same time.

I used this recipe (doubled) from epicurious. I nixed the cabbage because cabbage is devil-food. I had a rough experience once that involved a very forceful Austrian woman and a bowl of sauerkraut. It’s ruined cabbage for me forever, which is a shame because apparently my Dad makes the world’s best sauerkraut…I’ll never know. Back to glorious food!

Pork Pot Stickers

Ingredients

    • 1/4 small head Napa cabbage, finely chopped (about 2 cups; 7 ounces) (No please, but do as you like)
    • 3/4 teaspoon kosher salt, plus 1/8 teaspoon for seasoning
    • 1/3 pound ground pork (not too lean)
    • 1 tablespoon fresh ginger, minced (from 1/2-inch knob)
    • 1 small carrot, coarsely shredded (about 2 tablespoons) (I bought matchstick carrots and they worked just fine)
    • 2 scallions, thinly sliced (about 1/4 cup)
    • 2 cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)
    • 1 tablespoon soy sauce
    • 2 teaspoons Asian (toasted) sesame oil
    • 1/2 egg, lightly beaten
    • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 30 gyoza (pot sticker) wrappers, from 1 (14-ounce) package (or, wonton wrappers will work too in a pinch)
    • 1/4 cup canola oil

Preparation

    1. In large bowl, toss together cabbage and 3/4 teaspoon salt and set aside for 30 minutes. Transfer to clean dish towel or cheesecloth, gather ends together, and twist to squeeze out as much water as possible. Wipe bowl clean, then return cabbage to it. Add pork, ginger, carrots, scallions, and garlic and stir to combine. (I started at “add pork” and skipped the cabbage step all together)
    2. In small bowl, whisk together soy sauce, sesame oil, and egg, then stir into cabbage-pork mixture. Stir in pepper and remaining 1/8 teaspoon salt.
    3. On dry surface, lay out 1 gyoza wrapper, keeping remaining wrappers covered with dampened cloth or paper towel. Spoon 1 1/2 teaspoons filling into center, then moisten halfway around edge with wet finger. Fold moisture-free half of wrapper over moistened half to form open half-moon shape. To seal, using thumb and forefinger of one hand, form 6 tiny pleats along unmoistened edge of wrapper, pressing pleats against moistened border to enclose filling. Moistened border will stay smooth and will automatically curve in semicircle. Stand dumpling, seam-side up, on baking sheet and gently press to flatten bottom. Cover loosely with dampened cloth or paper towel. Form remaining dumplings in same manner. (I dipped my finger in water and moistened the edges of the wonton wrapper and then laid it on the empanada press. I put about a tsp of filling in the middle and pressed it, the extra wrapper peeled away at the edges and I was left with a small, but yummy, pot sticker. I did follow the instruction of keeping the completed pot stickers under a damp cloth so they didn’t dry out)
    4. In 10-inch, lidded, non-stick skillet over moderately high heat, heat oil until hot but not smoking, (remember hot pan then cold oil) then remove from heat and arrange pot stickers in tight circular pattern standing up in oil (they should touch one another). Cook, uncovered, until bottoms are pale golden, 2 to 3 minutes. Add 1/2 cup water, tilting skillet to distribute, then cover tightly with lid and cook until liquid has evaporated and bottoms of dumplings are crisp and golden, 7 to 10 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons more water if skillet looks dry before bottoms are browned. Remove lid and cook, shaking skillet to loosen pot stickers, until steam dissipates, 1 to 2 minutes. Invert large plate with rim over skillet. Using pot holders, hold plate and skillet together and invert skillet. Remove skillet and serve pot stickers warm. (or just take them out with tongs or a slotted spatula which is what I did because I wasn’t about to pour oil/hot water on myself which I would have inevitably done because the oil/water NEVER completely dissipates or evaporates.

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